Fall 2013 Social Justice Practitioner-in-Residence Events

The Social Justice Policy Practitioner-in-Residence program gives Five College students and faculty unique opportunities to engage with and learn from individuals who have hands-on policymaking experience. By offering occasions to interact with those who have chosen lives of service, the residency program will help students imagine careers of their own that might advance the common good.

Tina Reynolds and Pete Tridish are the fall 2013 Five College Social Justice Practitioners-in-Residence. During their residencies, Reynolds and Tridish will participate in the following events, which are meant to educate and inspire the Five College community.

Pete Tridish Residency Events

BUILDING AN ITTY BITTY TRANSMITTER

date | Monday, Sept. 23-Friday, Sept. 27
time | 9:15-10:05 a.m.
location | Dean Technical High School, 1045 Main St., Holyoke

description | Pete Tridish runs a weeklong workshop, teaching high school students how to build a radio transmitter.

INTRO TO THEORIES AND CONCEPTS OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION CLASS VISIT

date | Monday, Sept. 23
time | 3:35 to 6:25 p.m.
location | Machmer W-11, University of Massachusetts Amherst

description | Process of theory construction, theory testing and paradigmatic change in communication. Theory relationships among normative and scientific studies. Theory types and their causal mechanisms, units of analysis, and research methodologies. Major theories compared in terms of their theoretical and metatheoretical bases.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Associate Professor Mari Castañeda.

A Radio Voice for the Voiceless Around the World

date | Tuesday, Sept. 24
time | 4 to 6 p.m.
location | Campus Center 903, University of Massachusetts Amherst

description | In much of the world, radio remains the most powerful medium and will remain that way for the near future. This lecture features radio stations and trainings with social movement groups in Nepal, Colombia, Jordan, Tunisia, Egypt, Nicaragua and Honduras.

DOCUMENTARY FILM CLASS VISIT

date | Wednesday, Sept. 25
time | 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
location | Art, Room 220, Mount Holyoke College

description | This course examines the principles, methods and styles of nonfiction film. Beginning with the "actualités" of film history's first practitioners and ending with contemporary self-reflexive films, such as Errol Morris's The Thin Blue Line, the class studies films that strive to represent some aspect of the real world as opposed to the fictional worlds of narrative cinema.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Professor Robin Blaetz.

INTERNET GOVERNANCE & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CLASS VISIT

date | Wednesday, Sept. 25
time | 2 to 4 p.m.
location | Gordon Hall 302, University of Massachusetts Amherst

description | This seminar introduces students to enduring and emerging information policy issues in public interest battles fought locally, nationally and globally for the control of Internet infrastructure, code and content. We will analyze how policy and regulation, politics, commercial interests, nation-states, transnational organizations and organized civil society actors are shaping our digital communication environment, considering the implications of Internet governance for democracy and human development.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Assistant Professor Martha Fuentes-Bautista.

GLOBAL COMMUNICATION THEORIES AND ISSUES CLASS VISIT

date | Thursday, Sept. 26
time | 2:30 to 3:45 p.m.
location | South College 108, University of Massachusetts Amherst

description | Forms of global communication have long been central to the constitution of relations between the diverse peoples of the world. This course will develop a conceptual framework to answer the following questions: What is globalization? What is its relation to post-modernity and capitalism? How has globalization been constituted by communication, particularly the electronic/digital media? How has this affected the way we as individuals perceive the world? How has the globalization of the media contributed to the formation of national cultural identities and social movements?

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Associate Professor Henry Geddes.

MEDIA JUSTICE NETWORK COMMUNITY MEETING

date | Monday, Sept. 30
time | 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
location | Free Press, 40 Main St. #301, Florence, MA

description | An open meeting of a new Pioneer Valley coalition dedicated to developing a diverse local media landscape.

more details | If you would like to attend this event, please contact Associate Professor Mari Castañeda.

DO DEMONSTRATIONS WORK? CAN THEY CHANGE TELECOM POLICY? A PRACTITIONER’S PERSPECTIVE

date | Tuesday, Oct. 1
time | 2-4 p.m. p.m.
location | Skype workshop

description | Pete Tridish will participate in an experts’ workshop at The New America Foundation’s conference titled “The Role of Advocacy in Media and Telecom Policy.” The conference is co-sponsored by the Institute of Information Policy at Penn State University, the Ford Foundation and CPPA.

more details | If you would like to participate in this session, please contact Assistant Professor Martha Fuentes-Bautista.

MEDIA IN EDUCATION CLASS VISIT

date | Tuesday, Oct. 1
time | 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
location | TBD

description | This is an introductory course in the field of language planning and policy which is situated in the broader field of sociology of language. Selected case studies will provide a basis for critically examining issues such as: ideology and language planning efface, language education policies, literacy movements, and language shift and death.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Professor Theresa Austin.

LAW BREAKERS TO LAWMAKERS: HOW PIRATE RADIO ACTIVISTS CHANGED THE LAWS TO OPEN UP THE AIRWAVES

date | Wednesday, Oct. 2
time | 5 p.m.
location | Media Education Foundation Community Room, 60 Masonic St., Northampton MA

description | In the late 1990s, a movement emerged of more than 1,000 pirate broadcasters around the USA, in civil disobedience against the corporate ownership of the main media outlets. This lecture examines what the low-power FM struggle communicates about social change, through political and technological action.

RADIO BARNRAISINGS: HOW WE GATHER A COMMUNITY TO BUILD A NEW RADIO STATION IN THREE DAYS

date | Thursday, Oct. 3
time | 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
location | WGBY Partyka Room, 44 Hampden St., Springfield, MA

description | This workshop demonstrates how an entire community can come together to create accessible media spaces. Drawing from the Amish rural tradition, radio barnraisings combine work, skill sharing, political spectacle and celebration to make a dramatic change in the empowerment of a community.

more details | If you would like to attend this event, please contact Associate Professor Mari Castañeda.

Tina Reynolds Residency Events

WOMEN INCARCERATED: PROSPECTS FOR HEALING, ORGANIZING AND SOCIAL CHANGE

date | Sunday, Nov. 17
time | 4 to 6 p.m.
location | Peace Development Fund Center for Peace and Justice, 44 N. Prospect St., Amherst

description | Tina Reynolds and others involved in the criminal justice movement share inspiring stories and lively discussion about their work and their goals.

WARFARE IN THE AMERICAN HOMELAND

date | Monday, Nov. 18
time | 1 to 4 p.m.
location | Franklin Patterson Hall 106, Hampshire College

description | Professor and activist Angela Davis recently asked "Are prisons obsolete?" And Grier and Cobb once noted "No imagination is required to see this scene as a direct remnant of slavery." Since the 1980s state and federal authorities have increasingly relied on the costly and unsuccessful use of jails and prisons as deterrents of crime. This upper division course grapples with ideas of incarceration and policing methods that contribute to the consolidation of state power and how it functions as a form of domestic warfare. This course takes a close look at how race (especially), but also class, gender, age and background intersect in shaping attitudes and perceptions toward incarceration and often determine who is incarcerated and who is not. While a number of individuals and organizations continue to push for prison abolition, dependence on advance methods of incarceration persists. As such, we will analyze the historic and contemporary tensions between incarceration and ideals of democracy, citizenship, family, community and freedom.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Assistant Professor Christopher Tinson.

A HUMAN RIGHTS PERSPECTIVE: REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE AND MASS CRIMINALIZATION OF BLACK AND BROWN WOMEN

date | Tuesday, Nov. 19
time | 1 to 2:30 p.m.
location | Campus Center 803, UMass Amherst

description | Black and brown women are the fastest growing population within our criminal justice system. In the United States penal system, more than 5 percent of women arrested are pregnant. What are the needs of this growing population around the right to have a child, the right to not have a child and the right to parent their children? Tina Reynolds discusses reproductive justice looking through a human rights lens and the impact of criminalization on black and brown women.

INTRO TO SOCIAL THOUGHT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY CLASS VISIT

date | Tuesday, Nov. 19
time | 4 to 6:30 p.m.
location | Dickinson 114, UMass Amherst

description | Focused on understanding the methodologies of social theory, political economy, and history, and issues of race, gender, global inequality, and the postcolonial world.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Katherine Mallory.

GENDER, LAW AND POLICY CLASS VISIT

date | Wednesday, Nov. 20
time | 11 a.m. to 12:10 p.m.
location | Seeyle Hall 320, Smith College

description | This course explores the legal status of women in the United States historically and today, focusing in the areas of employment, education, sexuality, reproduction, the family and violence. We will study constitutional and statutory law as well as public policy. Some of the topics we will cover are sexual harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination, and pregnancy discrimination. We will study feminist activism to reform the law and will examine how inequalities based on gender, race, class, and sexuality shape the law. We will also discuss and debate contemporary policy and future directions.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Associate Professor Carrie Baker.

REGULATING CITIZENSHIP

date | Wednesday, Nov. 20
time | 2 to 4:40 p.m.
location | Hampshire County Jail

description | This course considers a fundamental issue that faces all democratic societies: How do we decide when and whether to include or exclude individuals from the rights and privileges of citizenship? In the context of immigration policy, this is an issue of state power to control boundaries and preserve national identity. The state also exercises penal power that justifies segregating and/or denying privileges to individuals faced with criminal sanctions. This course will describe and examine the many forms of exclusion and inclusion that occur in contemporary democracies and raise questions about the purpose and justice of these processes. We will also explore models of social change that would promote more inclusive societies.

more details | If you would like to sit in on this class, please contact Professor Kristin Bumiller.
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION: REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE AND THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

date | Wednesday, Nov. 20
time | 6 to 7:30 p.m.
location | Faculty Lounge, Franklin Patterson Hall, Hampshire College

description | Tina Reynolds will participate in a conversation with locally and nationally based activists and advocates who work at the intersection of reproductive justice and the criminal justice system. Come hear about their research, organizing strategies, and how they are mobilizing in their own communities to end reproductive and gender injustice inside prisons. Presented by the Civil Liberties and Public Policy program at Hampshire College.

more details | Please RSVP for this event by emailing Lucy Trainor.
“ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK” IN THE AGE OF MASS CRIMINALIZATION OF WOMEN

date | Thursday, Nov. 21
time | 4 to 5:30 p.m.
location | Commonwealth College Events Hall East, UMass Amherst

description | Tina Reynolds joins Piper Kerman, author of Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison, for a conversation about women’s rights in America’s prison industrial complex and the new Netflix series based on Kerman’s memoir.


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